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African Americans in Hawai'i

Images of America

by D. Molentia Guttman
Ernest Golden

eBook

During the early 1800s, about two dozen men of African descent lived in Hawai'i. The most noteworthy was Anthony D. Allen, a businessman who had traveled around the world before making Hawai'i his home and starting a family there in 1810. The 25th Black Infantry Regiment, also known as the Buffalo Soldiers, arrived in Honolulu at the Schofield Barracks in 1913. They built an 18-mile trail to the summit of Mauna Loa, the world's largest shield volcano, and constructed a cabin there for research scientists. After World War II, the black population of Hawai'i increased dramatically as military families moved permanently to the island. Hawai'i has a diverse population, and today about 35,000 residents, approximately three percent, claim African ancestry.


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Publisher: Arcadia Publishing Inc.

Kindle Book

  • Release date: February 7, 2011

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781439625217
  • Release date: February 7, 2011

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9781439625217
  • File size: 46621 KB
  • Release date: September 14, 2012

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

subjects

History Nonfiction

Languages

English

During the early 1800s, about two dozen men of African descent lived in Hawai'i. The most noteworthy was Anthony D. Allen, a businessman who had traveled around the world before making Hawai'i his home and starting a family there in 1810. The 25th Black Infantry Regiment, also known as the Buffalo Soldiers, arrived in Honolulu at the Schofield Barracks in 1913. They built an 18-mile trail to the summit of Mauna Loa, the world's largest shield volcano, and constructed a cabin there for research scientists. After World War II, the black population of Hawai'i increased dramatically as military families moved permanently to the island. Hawai'i has a diverse population, and today about 35,000 residents, approximately three percent, claim African ancestry.


Expand title description text